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Blu-ray Discs Increase Storage Capacity

Blu-ray MediaHawksM15 October 2010

What does 1TB of storage look like? Try a combination of multiple BDXL discs in the form of a data backup cartridge prototype archive system. LG-Hitachi has unveiled its maximum storage capacity system at an electronics show in Japan.

Similar to a network-attached storage device, the system holds four HDD bays for replication and two additional slots for cartridges; each cartridge can hold up to eight BDXL Blu-ray discs, equating the one terabyte of extra storage.

Due to its unprecedented storage capacity this new system could be used for archiving large quantities of data from hard drives to Blu-ray discs, or for HDTV storage purposes. Plus, archive retrieval is even easier with the inclusion of an RFID chip that can be scanned with a handheld device to reveal the data contained on each disc.

No pricing has been issued, but LG-Hitachi plans to release the system to market sometime next year.

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Blu-ray Disc Capacity Continues to Expand

Blu-ray MediaHawksM05 August 2010

How does 100GB disc storage capacity sound to you? For the consumers and major Blu-ray production distributors alike, that number sounds pretty darn good. Verbatim, TDK, and Sharp are among just a few of the companies preparing to sell Blu-ray discs with double the previous storage capacity.

Based on a statement released in mid-July, Sharp will be the first to offer 100GB-capacity discs; its product, the VR-100BR1 will conform to the Blu-ray Disc Association’s new BDXL format specification and can be written only once.

TDK will debut its larger capacity Blu-ray discs in September, and Verbatim will begin shipping its discs sometime next year.

The 100GB-capacity discs utilizing the new BDXL format, will add a third storage layer and, if all goes as planned, will one day be able to add a fourth layer of storage, increasing storage capacity to 128GB. Currently Blu-ray discs are available in 25GB with single-layer storage and 50GB for dual-layer storage.

While the higher-capacity Blu-ray discs will not be necessary for movies – traditional 50GB discs have the capacity to store 3D media – the new BDXL media format reportedly won’t work on traditional Blu-ray drives. Users would need to purchase new drives. Sharp, however, is prepared to meet this demand with its new Aquos BD-HDW700/BD-HDW70 Blu-ray disc recorders for the 100GB capacity discs available in now in Japan. These types of recorders, like DVD+/-RW drives, can be used for archiving and data, video, and image storage.

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Blu-ray Disc Association Develops New Technology to Increase Capacity

Blu-ray MediaHawksM01 July 2010

Blu-Ray MediaBlu-ray discs have been on their way to taking over the home movie market for quite a while, but now the Blu-ray Disc Association is stepping up its game. They have developed what is being called the BDXL format which allows a Blu-ray Disc to hold up to 128GB of information in a quadruple-layer format – a significant increase from the average 50GB high-definition Blu-ray discs on the market today.

The new BDXL format will also come in a triple-layer version, which will be rewriteable, however the first release will only be available for data storage.

“The BDA worked diligently to create an extension of the Blu-ray Disc format that leverages the physical structure of the design of the disc to create even more storage capacity,” said Victor Matsuda, Blu-ray Disc Association Global Promotions Committee chair.

Sony has not as of yet agreed to take the new BDXL capture and playback product to the consumer market, but admits that it may not be long before players may be capable of playing the BDXL format as well as the conventional 2GB and 50GB Blu-ray discs. Both types of formats were developed from the same technology.

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Verbatim’s Partner Blu-ray Disc Plant Announces Increase of Production Lines

Blu-ray MediaHawksM17 June 2010

As promised, the president of the Mitsubishi Chemical Infonics (MCI) plant has agreed to increase production of Blu-ray discs (BD) at its Singapore plant to keep pace with consumer demand.

A new manufacturing facility has opened production of at least two lines for the BD-R DL 50GB and BD-R LTH 2GB products. The BD-R DL production line has also been jump-started and was scheduled to begin shipping in May.

The expanded production schedule will increase the plant’s production by 300,000 discs per month, and the BD-R LTH line, alone, will increase in production from 400,000 discs per month to close to 1 million discs with a specific focus on 4x and 6x high-speed recordable products

To make the production increase possible Mitsubishi Kagaku Media Co., Ltd., owner of the MCI plant, has instituted technological innovations that combine the company’s inorganic recording layer technology, BD-R double-layer single-sided technology, and DVD+/-R DL double-layer technology to manufacture high-quality BD-R DL discs. The company also drew on dye media technology used on it CD-R, DVD+/-R, and DVD+/-R DL lines along and pioneering media design engineering to create a reliable organic recording dye for the BD-R LTH production line.

Mitsubishi Kagaku Media is expected to announce further production expansion in the coming months.

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Primera Blu-ray Disc Publishers Get a Speed Boost

Responding to a surge in demand for personal-use Blu-ray disc publishers, Primera, the Minnesota-based manufacturer of CD/DVD publishers, has announced the release of Blu-ray recordable drives with 12x burn speeds.

Previously only offered at up to 8x burn speeds, Primera’s Bravo Series Blu-ray disc publishers are now better able to accommodate users in some of the most in-demand personal-use fields – wedding and events videographers and low-budget filmmakers.

With this release Primera has also replaced USB 2.0 with new high-speed eSATA interface, which can reach transfer rates that triple that of USB 2.0.

“With 12x drives and eSATA interfaces, Primera’s Bravo-Series Disc Publishers are the fastest way to produce professional-quality burned and printed Blu-ray Discs,” said Mark D. Strobel, Primera’s vice president of sales and marketing.

The Bravo Series disc publishers are available in four versions with the faster burn speeds; all are capable of burning direct-to-disc, full-color printing.

  • Bravo SE Blu Disc Publisher – one disc drive, 20-disc capacity ($2,995)
  • BravoPro Xi Blu Disc Publisher – one disc drive, 100-disc capacity ($4,995)
  • BravoPro Xi2 Blu Disc Publisher – two drives, 100-disc capacity ($4,995)
  • Bravo XRP-Blu Disc Publisher – two drives, rack mountable, 100-disc capacity ($8,995)

If you need help choosing a Primera blu-ray, CD or DVD publishing system. Call one of the Gotmedia expert staff at 866-409-1090.

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The Tutorial: Holographic Versatile Discs HVD

Blu-ray MediaHawksM28 May 2010

The Holographic Versatile Disc, known as HVD, uses a collinear holography technology to hold even more than a CD, DVD, or even a Blu-ray disc – up to 1 terabyte of information, amounting to 200 times more storage than a DVD and 20 times more storage than a Blu-ray. And with a transfer rate of 1 gigabyte per second (125 MBs), HVD technology far outshines it competition.

So with all these accolades why hasn’t HVD taken off? The technology has been around for years, but the precision required to use it has made it too expensive to put on mainstream consumer shelves.

How It Works

To start with the basics, holography is “the method of recording patterns of light to produce a three-dimensional object.” These recorded patterns are called holograms. The light is captured by using a split laser beam – divided into a reference beam and an information beam – which passes through an image. When the light hits an image it creates a “light interference” pattern. By capturing this pattern in a photosensitive polymer layer of a disc, the light pattern of the image is recorded onto the disc.

The reference beam can be reflected directly onto the hologram to retrieve the stored light pattern. The image reflected off the hologram is sent to the CMOS sensor to recreate the original image. The patterns are stored in overlapping layers to maximize storage capabilities as opposed to side-by-side on DVDs.

Why It’s Not Available

Primarily the technology has been too complex and with little-to-no adoption in the market, is relatively incompatible with current systems; HVD contain no servo data. Early HVDs were typically thicker than most CDs and DVDs.

Optware, however, has made great strides to bring HVD to market. The laser beams system is simplified; now touch the recording medium at the same angle – the collinear method. And HVD discs now include servo data and are have been slimed down to be the same thickness as CDs and DVDs.

The Breakdown

How does HVD compare?

 

Blu-ray

HD-DVD

HVD

Initial cost for recordable disc

Approx. $18

Approx. $10

Approx. $120

Initial cost for recorder/player

Approx. $2,000

Approx. $2,000

Approx. $3,000

Initial storage capacity

54 GB

30 GB

300 GB

Read/write speed

36.5 Mbps

36.5 Mbps

1 Gbps

Source: Howstuffworks.com

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Professional Blu-ray Recordable Media for High Definition

Blu-ray MediaHawksM23 January 2010

blu-ray-disc-layers
5x More Storage Capacity Than a Single Layer DVD

Stores 25 GB for 135 minutes of High Definition Video
Also available in dual layer 50 GB Capacity

Superb Speed
High resolution and fast recordings at high speeds

  • Transfer rates for 2x up to 9 MB per second
  • Transfer rates for 4x up to 18 MB per second
  • Transfer rates for 6x up to 27 MB per second

blu-ray-write-speeds
Longevity

  • Recording layers made from highly stable inorganic dye
  • Resistance to light exposure increases disc life

Durable

  • Surface is protected with Hard Coating
  • Withstands dirt, scratches, and fingerprints

Printable Surfaces
Available in a wide variety of printable surfaces for a professional look.
Compatible with most inkjet & thermal printers, Rimage Everest, & Teac P55.
As well as unbranded, shiny silver surface.

Blue Laser Technology Means Increased Capacity

The key technology behind the Blu-ray disc is the blue laser, which has a wavelength of only 405nm (billionths of a meter).  DVDs use a pure red laser with a wavelength of 650nm, and CDs use a 780nm wavelength infra-red laser.  The benefit of having a blue laser with a shorter wavelength means it is possible to write smaller data pits, and significantly increase the amount of data stored on a disc.

disc-lasers-cd-dvd-blu-ray

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Blu-ray LTH Type Discs

Blu-ray MediaHawksM20 November 2009

Blu-ray, also known as Blu-ray Disc (BD) is the next-generation optical disc format developed to enable recording, rewriting and playback of high-definition video (HD), as well as storing large amounts of data. The applications for Blu-ray span the entire storage spectrum–Data, Audio, Photo and Video storage for personal and professional use.
lth-bd-r

Verbatim BD-R LTH Type Technology BD-R LTH Type discs offer a more affordable solution to high-definition video storage. In comparison to standard BD-R discs which use inorganic dye, BD-R LTH discs use an organic AZO layer which MKM developed leveraging its many years of success in developing organic AZO recording layers for CD-R and DVD-R media. BD-R LTH Type media is applied using the same dye spin coating process as CD-R or DVD-R media.

Recorded data lies close to the surface of BD discs. Therefore all Verbatim BD media features a proprietary Hard Coat finish. This layer provides added protection from scratches, dust particles and fingerprints that can damage data and cause recording and playback errors.

  • Store up to 25GBs of information on BD-R LTH Type discs
  • BD-R LTH discs can record at speeds up to 2X
  • Increased sensitivity to laser light – Key requirement for optimized recording performance
  • Controls heat interference between consecutive recorded marks – Less jitter and reduced degradation of recording marks
  • Wide power margin – Excellent recording compatibility and prolonged archival life

BD-R LTH Type Recorder Compatibility With increased availability of recorders, players and camcorders that support this new technology, the demand for BD-R LTH is high. The following BD disc recorders (Format v1.2 standard) are compatible with the latest LTH Type BD Recordable discs*, as of November 2009:

data-storage

Panasonic – All new and legacy burners (except legacy slim burner)
Sony –
Currently testing LTH Type to support with new recorders
Pioneer – New burners by updated firmware
HLDS’s – New burner currently support LTH Type

*Compatibility depends on drive manufacturer and subject to change

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Affordable Blu-ray Media BD-R LTH Type Discs

Blu-ray MediaHawksM01 April 2009

Blu-ray LTH Type Discs
Blu-ray, also known as Blu-ray Disc (BD) is the next generation optical disc format developed to enable recording, rewriting and playback of  high-definition video (HD), as well as storing large amounts of data. The applications for Blu-ray span the entire storage spectrum–Data, Audio, Photo and Video storage for personal and professional use.

With the availability of LTH Type hardware and firmware from industry leaders such as Sony and Panasonic, the momentum is already building for media that will enable consumers to move up to the more affordable BD media. Verbatim 25GB BD-R LTH Type discs feature a new technically advanced organic dye in the recording layer that can be burned at speeds of 1x and 2x. By switching from the more expensive inorganic layer used with current BD-R to the new organic layer, manufacturing costs can be reduced.

Leveraging its many years of success in developing organic AZO recording layers for CD-R and DVD-R media, MKM developed a new organic AZO recording layer for the BD-R LTH Type media and produced sample discs for testing.

The patented AZO dye used in the recording layer of Verbatim BD-R LTH Type media provides a unique combination of features that range from increased sensitivity to laser light — the key requirement for optimized recording performance, to control the heat interference between consecutive recorded marks for substantially less jitter and reduced degradation of recording marks. The innovative dye also features a wide power margin to ensure quality recording on the entire disc surface.

Unlike current BD-R discs, in which the inorganic recording layer is made by the sputtering process, the organic recording layer for BD-R LTH TYPE media can be applied using the same dye spin coating process as CD-R or DVD-R media. As a result, Verbatim will be able to begin mass production of its BD-R LTH TYPE by only slightly modifying existing CD-R or DVD-R production lines and by adding the cover layer coating process with super hard coat feature.

Verbatim BD-R LTH Type Technology
BD-R LTH Type discs offer a more affordable solution to high-definition video storage. In comparison to standard BD-R discs which use inorganic dye, BD-R LTH discs use an organic AZO layer which MKM developed leveraging its many years of success in developing organic AZO recording layers for CD-R and DVD-R media. BD-R LTH Type media is applied using the same dye spin coating process as CD-R or DVD-R media. Recorded data lies close to the surface of BD discs. Therefore all Verbatim BD media features a proprietary Hard Coat finish. This layer provides added protection from scratches, dust particles and fingerprints that can damage data and cause recording and playback errors.

BD-R LTH Type Recorder Compatibility
With increased availability of recorders, players and camcorders that support this new technology, the demand for BD-R LTH is high. The following BD disc recorders (Format v1.2 standard) are compatible with the latest LTH Type BD Recordable discs*:
Panasonic – All new and legacy burners (except legacy slim burner)
Sony – Currently testing LTH Type to support with new recorders
Pioneer – New burners by updated firmware
HLDS’s – New burner currently support LTH Type

Features and Benefits:

  • Store up to 25GBs of information on BD-R LTH Type discs
  • BD-R LTH discs can record at speeds up to 2X
  • Increased sensitivity to laser light – Key requirement for
    optimized recording performance
  • Controls heat interference between consecutive recorded
    marks – Less jitter and reduced degradation of recording marks
  • Wide power margin – Excellent recording compatibility and
    prolonged archival life

*Compatibility depends on drive manufacturer and subject to change

Verbatim Blu-ray Media LTH
Verbatim BD-R LTH, 96569 expected Summer 2009.

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Blu-ray Media, Recordable BD-R

Blu-ray MediaHawksM19 March 2009

Blu-ray disc technology is changing the way professionals and consumers store data. High-definition video technology seems to be springing up everywhere these days – business for HD flat screen TVs has increased significantly in recent years, for instance. High def video produces 1080 lines of resolution — versus standard definition, which only provides 480 lines. Thanks to these additional details, HD video looks far more crisp.

Unfortunately, getting HD video stored effectively poses something of a technical and logistical challenge. The answer to this challenge is Blu-ray disc technology (also known as “BD”). BD is a next-generation optical format which uses a blue laser — hence the “blu” in the name “Blu-ray” — to minimize the pitting size required on the surface of discs, so you can fit more information on a given surface area. A Blu-ray disc has a capacity 25 GB of data on a single layer and  50GB capacity for dual layer BD-R, which equates to over 9 hours of HD Video storage with a dual layer BD-R.

Many companies, such as Verbatim, have taken Blu-ray technology to the next level by using special films and coatings to ensure the integrity of recordings and prevent smudging or scratching which can cause data errors. Blue lasers have a shorter wavelength than red lasers that are used in standard DVD-R.  This allows the laser in BD-R to be  incredibly close to the disc surface to ensure higher fidelity and more accuracy.

Blu-ray discs even have more capacity than dual layer DVD-Rs (which store around 8.5 GB) and now defunct HD DVD-Rs (which pack in 15 GB per side). You’re not going to get super fast recording speed here – generally you’ll get 2X or 4X – but the amount of information you can pack onto a disc more than makes up for this slower speed. You can also find “mini” Blu-ray discs which yield a still impressive storage capacity of 7.5 GB.

Please visit our Blu-ray media section for a full line-up of avaiable Blu-ray Media from Verbatim, MAM-A and TDK.

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